Oct 25

The 3 Points of Mastering Engineering

Mastering engineering adds a lot to your final product when it comes to your record. Right now we’re going to identify 3 points of mastering engineering and get a much better understanding of what goes into it and why it is necessary.mastering engineering

First, and this applies to all mastering, but mastering engineering will significantly improve the quality of your audio. While a lot of people make the mistake of believing and assuming that mastering simply raises the volume on your music; the truth is this is just a byproduct of the process. Once a song has been recorded in full and the various tracks which make up that song are mixed together into a final mix, that final mix is sent over to the mastering engineer.

At this stage, the engineer artfully applies plug-ins such as reverb and EQ. These effects ultimately give the track a much more professional and glossy sound with reverb adding more atmosphere to the track and EQ placing emphasis on certain ranges in the mix.

The difference between a master track and on master track is generally very palpable and ideally should be more than just boosting the volume but should really make the audio sound cleaner and crisper. Even just a few tweaks can make your audio sound that much better which is why it’s such an essential final part in audio production.

Mastering engineering isn’t simply an exclusively about correcting and improving the audio itself, however. The second thing which mastering engineering adds to your record is that it creates a complete image for your full record. If you’re planning on sending your completed record off to be replicated into CDs or vinyl records, you need to create that completed file for the record.

The mastering engineer creates this out of the tracks and sets things like spacing in between each track and affects how each song on the record flows into one another. Ultimately the mastering engineer ensures that everything is perfect on that completed album file before it gets sent off for replication at the factory because otherwise if there is some problem such as a particular track doesn’t start when it’s supposed to, this can equal a very costly mistake once you’ve run off some pressing.

Finally, mastering engineering at data to your CD and the files on the CD. This includes the song title and artist information and ISR codes. It even includes things like copyright protection or lyrics to the songs which can be accessed via a computer on a compact disc version of your music.

Ultimately, you can think of audio mastering engineering as being that final step in putting together a much cleaner product for your listeners before it gets sent out. Without it, your audio will not sound nearly as professional and each of your mixes which make up the record will likely jump around being set and recorded at different levels so you need the engineer to tie everything together and that final step of mastering.